1. Learn about this resource. 

Residents can use financial assistance from us—DC Government—to replace lead-based paint from their homes. You can receive up to $11,000 in assistance towards lead-based paint repairs. We work with a local nonprofit to pay for the projects and find a repair person to complete work on your home.

 

This program is called the Lead Reduction Program and is offered by the Department of Energy & Environment.

2. Check if you are eligible.

You are eligible if all of these statements are true:

  • You live in DC.

  • A child 6 years old or younger either lives with you or spends at least three hours a day, two days a week, or 60 hours a year at your home; or a pregnant person lives with you.

  • You live in a house or building built before 1978.

  • Your household’s annual gross income—your income before paying taxes—is at or below the limits based on your household size. You can check by answering the two questions below.

reduce lead paint in your home?

DO YOU WANT TO

What happens after I apply?


  1. Within one day of your application, we—DC Government—will call you to let you know if your application has been approved, and we’ll appoint a local nonprofit to pay for and arrange the work.
  2. The local nonprofit will arrange for a repairperson to inspect your home for lead. They’ll provide us an estimate of the cost to remove and repair the lead-based paint in your home. If they find any other sources of lead in their inspection, we’ll let you know and work with you to address those.
  3. The repairperson will remove or repair the lead-based paint, test to make sure the repairs were done correctly, and then inspect your home for lead again.
  4. Your home is lead-safe! You or your landlord will agree to monitoring your home for lead and keeping it safe.
If you are not approved for the repairs, we will let you know about other programs that may be able to help.




Are there any additional requirements I should know about?


Sometimes, the contractor may need you to relocate for a few days to do the repairs. We—DC Government—can provide funds to cover relocation on a case-by-case basis. However, you or your landlord may be responsible for the costs of your own relocation.




Who should I contact if I have questions?


First, take a look at the frequently asked questions at the bottom of the page. If you still have questions, please reach out to the Lead Reduction team at (202) 299-3316, Monday to Friday, 9 am to 5 pm. Or, you can email LaWanda.Jones@dc.gov using the subject line “Lead Reduction Program.”




I still need help with making my home safer. What should I do?


You can find information about other resources that might help on our home safety and lead protection pages.




Frequently Asked Questions


I’ve received the repairs to my home and have decided to rent it out instead of living there myself. Are there any special requirements that I have to follow? Yes. For three years after the repairs have been completed, you must prioritize advertising and renting your home to families with children that are six years old and younger or to pregnant women. You must also continue to monitor the home for lead and keep it lead-safe. Do I need to pay anything to get the repairs? We—DC Government—cover the costs for the entire process, including the initial inspection, the repairs, tests, and the final inspection. If you need to relocate while the repairs are done, we may offer financial assistance to cover your relocation costs on a case-by-case basis. You must agree to monitor for lead and keep the home lead-safe in the future, and you would be responsible for the costs to do so. Who completes the work? We’ll assign a local nonprofit to arrange for and pay for the repairs. The repairs will be completed by a licensed repair person with the proper certifications. How long does the repair process take? Depending on the size of your home and how much work needs to be done, repairs can take 1-10 business days. In some cases, the repairs may take longer. Does this program test whether my child has been exposed to lead? No, the program does not test your child for lead exposure. By law, all children who live in the District of Columbia must be tested for lead at ages 6–14 months and 22–26 months. An easy way to remember: Test every child, twice by two. In addition, we require all children six years old and younger that live in a home that gets repairs to be screened for lead exposure. For more information on lead screening, contact your pediatrician or the District's Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program at 202-535-2600. Does this program give priority to households with a child that has elevated blood lead levels? Yes, we prioritize households with children who have elevated blood lead levels. My household doesn’t have any income. How can I prove that? If your household doesn’t have any income, you can submit one of these documents with your application:

  • An notarized income statement,
  • A screenshot of your "Claimant Profile" page on the Department of Employment Services (DOES) website showing that your "Balance" is zero ( see example),
  • A recent letter from your former employer stating that you no longer work there (if you've lost your job but are not yet receiving unemployment benefits from DOES), OR
  • A recent letter from the District of Columbia Housing Authority (DCHA) stating that your household doesn't have any income




Do all eligible applicants get to replace their lead-based paint?


No, funding for repairs is on a first-come, first-serve basis. This program launched in 2020, so we aren’t sure how many residents will apply or receive funds.





4. Gather more information.

What happens after I apply?


  1. Within one day of your application, we—DC Government—will call you to let you know if your application has been approved, and we’ll appoint a local nonprofit to pay for and arrange the work.
  2. The local nonprofit will arrange for a repairperson to inspect your home for lead. They’ll provide us an estimate of the cost to remove and repair the lead-based paint in your home. If they find any other sources of lead in their inspection, we’ll let you know and work with you to address those.
  3. The repairperson will remove or repair the lead-based paint, test to make sure the repairs were done correctly, and then inspect your home for lead again.
  4. Your home is lead-safe! You or your landlord will agree to monitoring your home for lead and keeping it safe.
If you are not approved for the repairs, we will let you know about other programs that may be able to help.




Are there any additional requirements I should know about?


Sometimes, the contractor may need you to relocate for a few days to do the repairs. We—DC Government—can provide funds to cover relocation on a case-by-case basis. However, you or your landlord may be responsible for the costs of your own relocation.




Who should I contact if I have questions?


First, take a look at the frequently asked questions at the bottom of the page. If you still have questions, please reach out to the Lead Reduction team at (202) 299-3316, Monday to Friday, 9 am to 5 pm. Or, you can email LaWanda.Jones@dc.gov using the subject line “Lead Reduction Program.”




I still need help with making my home safer. What should I do?


You can find information about other resources that might help on our home safety and lead protection pages.




Frequently Asked Questions


I’ve received the repairs to my home and have decided to rent it out instead of living there myself. Are there any special requirements that I have to follow? Yes. For three years after the repairs have been completed, you must prioritize advertising and renting your home to families with children that are six years old and younger or to pregnant women. You must also continue to monitor the home for lead and keep it lead-safe. Do I need to pay anything to get the repairs? We—DC Government—cover the costs for the entire process, including the initial inspection, the repairs, tests, and the final inspection. If you need to relocate while the repairs are done, we may offer financial assistance to cover your relocation costs on a case-by-case basis. You must agree to monitor for lead and keep the home lead-safe in the future, and you would be responsible for the costs to do so. Who completes the work? We’ll assign a local nonprofit to arrange for and pay for the repairs. The repairs will be completed by a licensed repair person with the proper certifications. How long does the repair process take? Depending on the size of your home and how much work needs to be done, repairs can take 1-10 business days. In some cases, the repairs may take longer. Does this program test whether my child has been exposed to lead? No, the program does not test your child for lead exposure. By law, all children who live in the District of Columbia must be tested for lead at ages 6–14 months and 22–26 months. An easy way to remember: Test every child, twice by two. In addition, we require all children six years old and younger that live in a home that gets repairs to be screened for lead exposure. For more information on lead screening, contact your pediatrician or the District's Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program at 202-535-2600. Does this program give priority to households with a child that has elevated blood lead levels? Yes, we prioritize households with children who have elevated blood lead levels. My household doesn’t have any income. How can I prove that? If your household doesn’t have any income, you can submit one of these documents with your application:

  • An notarized income statement,
  • A screenshot of your "Claimant Profile" page on the Department of Employment Services (DOES) website showing that your "Balance" is zero ( see example),
  • A recent letter from your former employer stating that you no longer work there (if you've lost your job but are not yet receiving unemployment benefits from DOES), OR
  • A recent letter from the District of Columbia Housing Authority (DCHA) stating that your household doesn't have any income




Do all eligible applicants get to replace their lead-based paint?


No, funding for repairs is on a first-come, first-serve basis. This program launched in 2020, so we aren’t sure how many residents will apply or receive funds.





This resource is provided by:

You do not need to be a homeowner to apply for this program.

Department of Energy and Environment

Keywords: District residents, lead testing, replace lead paint, child, pregnant person, kid, babysitting, expecting

This page was last updated July 2021.