get a rebate for replacing concrete or asphalt with permeable pavers or vegetation?

DO YOU WANT TO

1. Learn about this resource. 

Property owners can receive a rebate for replacing concrete, asphalt, or brick with permeable pavers or vegetation at a residential building, commercial building, or community space in target areas in DC (blue on this map). Permeable surfaces capture and temporarily store rain to reduce polluted water from getting into our rivers. We—DC Government—offer a one-time rebate of $5 per square foot of the surface that you're replacing with vegetation and $10 per square foot replaced with permeable pavers. You can receive up to $4,000 and not more than the cost of your project.

 

This program is called RiverSmart Rebates and is offered by the Department of Energy & Environment, in partnership with Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay, a local nonprofit.

2. Check if you are eligible.

You are eligible if all of these statements are true:

  • You own a residential building, commercial building, house of worship, or community space in DC.

  • Your property is in DC’s municipal storm sewer system. Search your address on this map, and if it’s on a block in blue, your property is eligible for the program.

  • Properties in the Historic Anacostia neighborhood are eligible, even though they are not blue on the map.

  • If your building needs to meet local stormwater management requirements, your project goes beyond what you’re required to do. If you’re not sure, contact Carly Starobin (cstarobin@allianceforthebay.org) for more information on your eligibility.

 

You don’t need to live in DC to apply, as long as the property you’re applying for is in DC.

This resource is provided by:

Keywords: landscaping, homeowners, business owners, community-based organizations, religious institutions, reimbursement, replacing concrete, replacing asphalt, replacing brick, permeable pavers, vegetation, reduce pollution, polluted water, sustainability, refund, discount, green home

This page was last updated May 2022.

Department of Energy and Environment